Nicole Conforti » Reading Intervention

Reading Intervention

Reading Specialist - Nicole Conforti
Welcome to my Reading Intervention Website!
 
If you are here, then your child was identified as needing extra support in Reading. As a Reading Specialist, I work with the Basic Skills Team to screen all students in grades K-2 three times throughout the school year in reading fluency and reading comprehension.  I also work with classroom teachers to closely monitor students' grades and classroom performance.  If a student falls below established expectations throughout the year, I will provide additional instruction to support their learning.  This instruction does not replace their classroom instruction but provides another layer of support for the student.  I use research-based interventions (Wilson) that focus on the needs of their students.  This more individualized instruction takes place within a small group setting in my classroom and progress monitoring occurs weekly to help measure each students' progress.  I have an enter and exit policy every 8-10 weeks. If the student mastered their achieved benchmark goals, that student will get a certificate of completion in my reading program and exit. This will enable other students in need of Reading Intervention to enter the program. 
 

Kindergarten

 

I will spend the first 4 months of the school year working 3 or 4 days a week in each Kindergarten classroom.  During this time, I collaborate with the classroom teacher to present lessons and activities to develop students' skills.  After the initial 4 months, I will identify Kindergarten students who are performing below expectations and would benefit from receiving additional Reading support.  These children, generally 4-6 students at a time, will be pulled out into my classroom for 30 minutes every day to receive additional instruction in the areas of letter identification, letter sounds, phonemic awareness, identifying sight words, as well as many other Kindergarten skills.  This instruction does not replace the instruction they receive within their classroom but is simply another layer of support to ensure they develop the skills they need to be successful.

First Grade

 

Following our district-wide screenings at the beginning of the school year, I will collaborate with our BSI Team and classroom teachers to identify first-grade students who are performing below expectations. These children, generally 3-4 students at a time, will visit my classroom for 40 minutes 3 or 4 times a week to receive additional instruction in the areas of word building and reading short and long vowels, oral reading fluency, and eventually reading comprehension.  Phonemic programs Wilson is also used to provide additional practice with phonetic skills.  This instruction does not replace the instruction they receive within their classroom but is simply another layer of support to ensure they develop the skills they need to be successful.

2nd Grade

 

Following our district-wide screenings at the beginning of the school year, I will collaborate with our BSI Team and classroom teachers to identify first-grade students who are performing below expectations. These children, generally 3-4 students at a time, will visit my classroom for 40 minutes 3 or 4 times a week to receive additional instruction in the areas of word building and reading leveled passages, increase their oral reading fluency, and use color-coding to increase their reading comprehension.  A phonemic program such as Wilson is also used to provide additional practice with phonetic skills.  This instruction does not replace the instruction they receive within their classroom but is simply another layer of support to ensure they develop the skills they need to be successful.

As parents, you are your child's most influential teacher with an important part to play in helping your child to learn to read.

 

Here are some suggestions on how you can help to make this a positive experience. 

 

1.  Set a good example

Help your child see that reading is important! Set a good example for your child by reading books, newspapers, and magazines.  Create a quiet, special place in your home for your child to read, write and draw. Keep books and other reading materials where your child can easily reach them.

 

2.  Introduce new words

Discuss new words. For example, "This big house is called a palace. Who do you think lives in a  palace?" Point out the printed words in your home and other places you take your child such as the grocery store. Spend as much time listening to your child as you do talking to him.

 

3.  Make reading enjoyable

Make reading an enjoyable experience. Sit with your child. Try not to pressure if he or she is reluctant. If your child loses interest then do something else.

 

4.  Maintain the flow

If your child mispronounces a word do not interrupt immediately. Instead, allow the opportunity for self-correction. It is better to tell a child some unknown words to maintain the flow rather than insisting on trying to build them all up from the sounds of the letters. If your child does try to 'sound out' words, encourage the use of letter sounds rather than 'alphabet names'.

 

5.  Be positive

If your child says something nearly right to start with that is fine. Don't say 'No. That's wrong,' but 'Let's read it together' and point to the words as you say them. Boost your child's confidence with constant praise for even the smallest achievement.

 

6.  Talk about the books

There is more to being a good reader than just being able to read the words accurately. Just as important is being able to understand what has been read. Always talk to your child about the book; about the pictures, the characters, how they think the story will end, their favorite part. You will then be able to see how well they have understood and you will help them to develop good comprehension skills.

 

7.  Begin collecting books

Encourage your child to use the public library regularly. Help your child start a home library; paperback books are fine. Encourage your child to swap books with friends. Check used bookstores. Give books as gifts.

Use the "Rule of Thumb" to see if a book is on your children's reading level: Have them read a page of the book aloud. Have them hold up one finger for each word they don't know. If they hold up four fingers and a thumb before the end of the page, the book is probably too hard for them to read alone. But it might be a great book to read aloud.

 

8.  Variety is important

Remember children need to experience a variety of reading materials eg. picture books, hard backs, comics, magazines, poems, and information books.

 

9.  Reading on the go . . .

Take books and writing materials with you whenever you leave home. This gives your child fun activities to entertain and occupy him while traveling and going to the doctor's office or other appointments.

 

10.  Communicate with teachers 

Be knowledgeable about your children's progress!  Talk with your child’s teacher and other specialists at your school if you have any concerns about your child’s reading or progress.

 

Most importantly . . . Read with your child EVERY day!

A great resource for students in Kindergarten and first grade.  This site reinforces literacy skills such as letter names, letter sounds, beginning sounds, word families, and beginning reading skills.

 

Use this link - www.starfall.com

A fun and engaging online program for building literacy skills for students in grades K-3. 

Reading Eggspress makes reading real books, improving spelling skills and building reading comprehension highly engaging for kids aged 7 to 13.

The online reading program is packed with hundreds of interactive reading activities, online children’s books, and literacy games. And it really works!

Contact your child's teacher for your child's login information to access Reading Eggs from home.

 

Use this link - www.readingeggs.com

The Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA) is an individually administered assessment of a child's reading capabilities. It is a tool to be used by instructors to identify students reading level, accuracy, fluency, and comprehension. ... The test measures nine categories of reading behavior and six types of errors.

At long last, the NJ Department of Education has released “The New Jersey Dyslexia Handbook: A Guide to Early Literacy Development & Reading Struggles”. This handbook was put together to serve as guidance as to how to identify, educate with proper intervention and support students with dyslexia and other language-based learning disabilities. Do note that the handbook is not a law, but should be an important tool for both parents and educators in making appropriate decisions about the student’s current and future education.

 

OCTOBER IS DYSLEXIA SCREENING MONTH

(2nd Grade) 

 

 

Dyslexia Screening Law: The NJ Dept. of Education (P.L.2013, C 210) has put into law that all students in the 1st semester of 2nd grade need to be screened for Dyslexia or other reading indicators. Union Beach Memorial School will be screening these students using a screening test. I, the Reading Specialist, will be administering the test. Students will be pulled out of their classrooms to take the test in a quiet environment for about 20-25 minutes.

The screening process will begin in Septemeber. I will send home a note informing you that I tested your child. If the assessment confirms any indicators of dyslexia or other reading disabilities, then further screenings will need to be done and you will be contacted. 

The five-finger rule

The five-finger rule is a quick and easy way for your child to check if a book is suitable to read on their own. Before they start, ask them to turn to a random page in the book and read it. For every word that they don’t know, they should hold up a finger.

Your child can use the following guidelines according to how many fingers they hold up:

0 or 1 – Most probably too easy for your child.

2 – A good choice that will give your child a reasonable challenge and allow them to learn new words.

3 – Your child might need some help, but still a good choice if they’re up for a challenge.

4 – May be too difficult for your child to read on their own. If you are on hand to give them help or read along with them it can be suitable, but if they are reading on their own, choose a different book.

5 – Most probably a bit too advanced, try a different book.

Important things to remember about the five finger rule

The five-finger rule should only be taught as a guideline for helping your child to find ‘just right’ books. It’s worthwhile remembering that if they have their heart set on a book that seems too hard, it’s probably OK to let them have a go. Be nearby to help them if they get stuck on a tricky word, and don’t forget to praise them for making an effort.

Alternatively, if you know they’ll struggle to enjoy the story or will likely feel despondent, tell them that they can read it later in the year and suggest a different book instead. At the end of the day, allowing your child to read the books they’re interested in (whether they’re too easy or too difficult) is an important part of nurturing and maintaining their love of books and reading.